Trouble Shooting

Lacks Power

richjudyhelm 10/24/01 11:37 pm

I finally got new tires and brakes and got my 49 Hot Shot on the road for the first time. It drives pretty nice but I can only get about 37 mph top speed on the level. It idles a little rough, but seems to rev up pretty good in neutral. Does anyone have any suggestions or theories about what may be the problem? I realize this is sort of like asking a doctor to diagnose an illness over the phone, but I thought some of you may have experienced similar problems in the past.

crosley19 10/25/01 12:08 am

I would venture to say it's carb troubles. If your engine is in good shape, and the compression is ok. Check that you don't have vacuum leaks at the intake or carb. I usually spray a little ether around the manifold and see if the engine picks up speed. ONLY USE ETHER ON A COLD MOTOR, DO NOT SPRAY IT AROUND A HOT EXHAUST MANIFOLD! If no vacuum leaks then take your carb apart, and make sure the main jet is not gummed up or dirty, also with the Tillotson carbs, you must have the high speed needle properly adjusted for the correct high speed mixture! This is another lesson in itself. Barry

crosleycamfollower 10/25/01 8:14 am

37 MPH, that's good, you mean Crosleys go faster than that? It's probably the carb, but keep an open mind!

bltlar 10/25/01 1:04 pm

Prob the carb. BUT have had problems like that with the distributor advance not working. Larry

chuckhk1941 10/25/01 4:44 pm

Open main jet(on base of fuel bowl) 1/4 turn-drive again-if better repeat again-if you go to far it will get very rich--

 

Crosley pooped out.....

iamrustless 2/23/02 1:58 pm

I took my VC for a drive today, after putting two new front tires on it. It just didn't seem to have any zip, wouldn't idle, etc. Almost seemed starved for fuel. Took the top off the carb (after removing the idle tube) and discovered that the idle tube had been cracked and bent at one time. Replaced that, and it ran great. Headed out for a ride, didn't get too far when it seemed to "run out of gas". Took the cap off the fuel pump, there was no fuel. Checked the diaphragm, it was ok. I then tried to blow through the fuel line to the tank. Plugged solid. (it is a rubber line all the way to the outlet pipe on the tank). Got an air tank/blow gun, blew air into the fuel line back into the tank (remove fuel cap before doing this!). It unplugged, and then I had fuel. Ran even better than before. What's inside the tank that could get plugged? Hal (afraid to go far now)

DaleF62 2/23/02 5:39 pm

Hal,

Most common thing that plugs a gas tank

is ....RUST! The only way to fix is to remove the tank and have it cleaned or clean yourself. Then replace tank and put a inline filter on and change regularly for awhile. There are many postings on gas tank cleaning. Dalef62

crosley52 2/23/02 5:56 pm

I have cleaned tanks before with pea sized stones from garden shop about 5 lbs. add some ajax cleanser and water and shake for a long time replacing water and cleanser occasionally, shake all out and rinse with water till clean, I use a hair dryer to dry out and then make covers for all holes and dump in a quart of tank liner seal it up and turn all over to coat all of inside, open and pour out excess back in can,tomorrow pour tank liner back in and recoat again and drain,when dry you have a tank that will last as long as you live and never rust again.. I get tank liner from Little Dearborn Ford Parts.

 

Here's a similar story.

mrcooby 2/23/02 6:30 pm

In 1985 I was invited to ride in the Wadsworth, Illinois parade aboard the Newport Township FD Crosley. There is a steep hill upward off the main street and the Crosley climbed it, and then died. The crew couldn't restart it. They then prepared to attach a chain to tow it through the parade. But how would that look? Thinking about that steep hill, I had a hunch that the tank outlet had plugged with silt while the Crosley climbed it. I told my hunch to the crew. Quickly they disconnected the fuel line at the pump and blew through ... hard! Reconnecting, we primed the carburetor, and it fired. The Crosley rolled proudly under its own power that beautiful September day. With me aboard.